The Preservation of Sámi Heritage – A Crack in the Facade of Sweden’s Moral Authority?

Sámieatnan duoddariid, dáid sámi mánáid ruovttu

galbma geađge guorba guovlu

sámi mánáid ruoktu

Sámiland’s wide expanses home to Sámi children 

cold barren rocky realm

home of Sámi children

Sámiland. Photo: Flickr, Alexander Cahlenstein

These are the first lines of the Sámi Artist Sofia Jannok’s song, in the English translation named Wide Open Tundra of the Sámiland. The Sámi people represent the indigenous population spread over the northern parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia. They are recognized as an indigenous population by the United Nations, giving them the right to preserve and develop their culture, language, traditions and identity as nomadic reindeer herders. 20-000 to 40-000 Sámi people live in the North of Sweden, where a constant conflict over land and natural resources has emerged throughout the past decades.

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Categories: Uncategorised

Why are feminist perspectives on migration important?

Last Thursday, 26th of April, we had the pleasure to listen to Maja Sager, PhD and associate senior lecturer at the Department of Gender Studies in Lund, in a FUF-seminar in Lund. She talked about feminist perspectives on migration, which is her research focus. The key question of the seminar was: Why is it important to analyse migration and refugee policy from feminist perspectives?

Maja has studied inequalities, racism, and sexism both on a local and a national level from an intersectional feminist perspective. Photo: Private.

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Categories: Women in Development

Sex abuse in a humanitarian context – time for a culture shift?

Women throughout history have faced sexual violence in conflict environments, but the recent allegations against humanitarian workers’ sexual misconduct might be the beginning of a shift towards fighting gender-based violence worldwide more proactively.

A women and her child walk along the main street of the Zaatari camp for Syrian refugees in Jordan, where sexual exploitation by men working for the UN and other international organisations has been reported. Photo: Flickr, Russell Watkins/Department for International Development.

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Categories: Women in Development

Consult the Users! How Toilets Impact the Fight for Gender Equality

When the train from Delhi sets off to the north of India, it passes by long fields at the outskirts of the capital. In the early morning, the passengers of the train can observe how dozens of men and women walk around in the field and eventually bend down to defecate. It is the daily routine of many people living in deprived areas in and outside of the city, where access to clean and safe toilets is restricted or even non-existent. The lack of privacy makes especially women more vulnerable.

Access to clean, protected and gender-separated toilets would encourage girls to go to school, also when they are menstruating. Photo: Flickr, Ignas Kukenys.

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Categories: Women in Development

Women Are Taking Over – Female-headed Households in Latin America

A study in Latin America found that, given equal conditions, female household heads experience better living conditions than their male counterparts. The number of female-headed households has increased rapidly over the last decades as more and more people diverge from traditional relationship and livelihood arrangements. What does this mean for development actors and how is this trend to be seen in light of persisting inequalities?

Conditions for women in Latin America are improving. A portrait of a woman with her child in the Peruvian Andes. Photo: pxhere, unknown.

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Categories: Women in Development

The struggle over food sovereignty is a feminist one

On a global scale, women produce more than half of all the food that is grown, but they are still the majority of those undernourished. The food sovereignty movement challenges the economic polarization within the food system and tries to address the causes of disempowerment that lead to hunger from a feminist perspective.

Members of Rural Women’s Farmers Association of Ghana preparing a field for sowing near Lawra. Photo: Global Justice Now, Flickr

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Categories: Women in Development

Menstruating in the 21st Century

The Menstrual Cup on The Rise. Photo: Flickr, Intima

Menstruation has historically been, and is still today, a cause of discrimination. Women in the past were separated from public spaces when menstruating and disqualified from most types of work because menstrual blood was seen upon as something dirty and sinful.

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Categories: Women in Development